2018-19 Classes Line-up

sign-up-button-mdContact instructor to reserve a spot and for more details.


DIG DEEP–Science for Teens

When: Starting 1/29/19, Tuesdays, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM, ages 12 +, $175 per semester, 13 weeks, Class full.
Mentor: Lance Conrad

This weekly class will be a great complement to your science studies at home. Over the course of the semester  we’ll cover topics in chemistry and physics. A combination of weekly creativity and problem-solving challenges, reading, lecture, field study, demonstrations, labs, and student projects will feed your child’s curiosity and help him or her learn accountability, group work and presentation skills. Contact: Lance Conrad, conradlit@gmail.com OR Kara Kisby, bountifulcreeksidelearning@gmail.com (Lance is an author, motivational speaker, kitchen scientist, and jack-of-many-trades whose love of knowledge and learning is infectious.)

GLADIATOR MATH & INVESTIGATOR SCIENCE–Math & Science Foundations for Big Kids
When: Starting 1/29/19, Tuesdays, 12:45 PM-3:00 PM, ages 8-12, $200 per semester, 13 weeks
Mentor: Lance Conrad

This weekly class will give your older children a setting in which to hone their mathematical and scientific thinking, feed their curiosity, and understand the planet they live on. Through competitive and cooperative games as well as speed and accuracy exercises, students will strengthen basic arithmetic skills. Using problem-solving challenges, demonstrations, field study, labs, hands-on projects, and occasional readings, students will explore various science topics and gain a solid understanding of the scientific method. Likely units will include electricity and circuits, science of survival (meteorology, astronomy, botany, physiology), physics of weapons, inventions and engineering, microbiology, and chemistry of food. Contact: Lance Conrad, conradlit@gmail.com OR Kara Kisby, bountifulcreeksidelearning@gmail.com (Lance is an author, motivational speaker, kitchen scientist, and jack-of-many-trades whose love of knowledge and learning is infectious.)

Math Lab 
When: Starting 1/29/19, Tuesdays, 9:00 AM-10:00 AM, ages 12+, $90 per semester, 13 weeks 
Tutors: Lance Conrad, Kara Kisby

This will be a dedicated time each week to bring the math you are currently working on, focus on it for the hour, get questions answered and motivation for the next week. Student brings his own materials/curriculum, sets a weekly work goal and is accountable for it each week. Maximum 4 students/tutor. We will open up as many spots as we can find tutors. Contact: Lance Conrad, conradlit@gmail.com OR Kara Kisby, bountifulcreeksidelearning@gmail.com (Lance is an author, motivational speaker, kitchen scientist, and jack-of-many-trades whose love of knowledge and learning is infectious.)

SEND AN E-MAIL with names and ages if you’d like to reserve a spot in any classes. bountifulcreeksidelearning@gmail.com

2017-18 Classes Line-Up

sign-up-button-mdAll classes take place in the vicinity of Bountiful High School. Contact instructor for more details. Fill out this form to reserve a spot. A $10 non-refundable deposit for each class is due by August 1, 2017 to secure your spot. PayPal to bountifulcreeksidelearning@gmail.com or e-mail for details on mailing a check.


Voyagers to Eureka! Math (THURSDAYS, 9:30-11:30, ages 10+, Instructor: Jennifer Lunceford, Cost $168/12 weeks, $336/all year, class-size maximum: 8) Another 12-week session will be held in the Winter/Spring semester, same cost and number of weeks. Class full. Waiting list.

Come on an amazing math quest to discover intriguing places and ancient peoples and their victories in mathematics and science.  Share understanding while engaging in hands on activities that invite in-depth reasoning and questioning.  Develop skills to effectively communicate and make connections in history, science and art. Prerequisites: Basic computational skills, completion of 5th grade math. Weekly homework. Contact: Jennifer Lunceford, auntjiff@gmail.com (Jennifer has both teaching and law degrees, lots of teaching experience, and has a passion for teaching math in a deep and engaging way to kids.)

 


Writer’s Workshop (THURSDAYS, 12:30-2:30 pm, ages 10+, Instructor: Marcee Monroe Ludlow, Cost $168/12 weeks, $336/all year, class-size maximum: 12) Another 12-week session will be held in the Winter/Spring semester, same cost and number of weeks. Class full. Waiting list.

Gain confidence and excitement as a writer as we write in the narrative, expository, and persuasive genres. We’ll have fun revising, talking about audience, and polishing paragraphs. Diagnose your own grammar ills and take home your own Writer’s Toolbox to help fix your writing in, out, and beyond class. Weekly writing assignments and some reading. Encouraged to complete a short, daily journal prompt. Contact: Marcee Ludlow, anonaly@gmail.com (Marcee Monroe Ludlow graduated from BYU with a degree in English and an emphasis in Creative Writing and received an MA from University of Texas at Austin in English and Rhetoric with a focus on teaching writing. She has taught writing at BYU, UT, and the College of Southern Idaho. She has taught many different subjects to many ages and in many capacities as a homeschool mom, a co-op teacher, and a community education instructor. Her heart belongs to the middle school age group.)


Field Trip Biology/Microbiology (TUESDAYS, 10 am-12 pm, ages 11+, Instructor: Lance Conrad, Cost $168/12 weeks, $336/all year, class-size maximum: 12) Another 12-week session will be held in the Winter/Spring semester (Field Trip Physics & Field Trip Chemistry), same cost and number of weeks. Class full. Waiting list.

The perfect weekly meet-up to complement your life science studies at home and inspire your child. Second, fourth, and sixth week classes will be field trips. We’ll focus on botany, human anatomy, cell science, microorganisms, and lab practices. Weekly memorization (key concepts and terms) and reading assignments. Parent transportation help required on at least one field trip. Contact: Lance Conrad, conradlit@gmail.com OR Kara Kisby, bountifulcreeksidelearning@gmail.com (Lance is an author, motivational speaker, kitchen scientist, and jack-of-many-trades whose love of knowledge and learning is infectious.)


Cultural, Situational, and Environmental Awareness (TUESDAYS, 12:30-2:30 pm, ages 11+, Instructor: Lance Conrad, Cost $168/12 weeks, $336/all year, class-size maximum: 12) Another 12-week session was held in the Fall semester (Geography & World Awareness/America’s Wars), same cost and number of weeks.

Trainees will be progressing through a whole range of life and interpersonal skills throughout the semester, from having famous quotes and quips at the ready, to gaining confidence in social situations, to understanding the psychology of and best course of action in a dangerous situation, to harnessing what nature provides for survival. We’ll learn how to read the signs in our immediate geography, consider the technologies and social systems of various civilizations, and increase our cultural literacy as we consider the best that humanity has produced in philosophy, art, and literature. Get ready to consider, compete, and conquer! There will be some memorization and reading challenges, a few take-home projects and some in-class presentations. Contact: Lance Conrad, conradlit@gmail.com OR Kara Kisby, bountifulcreeksidelearning@gmail.com (Lance is an author, motivational speaker, kitchen scientist, and jack-of-many-trades whose love of knowledge and learning is infectious.)


Thursday Electives

Group Sports & Games Instructor: Kara Kisby (Thursdays, 10 am-11:30 am, ages 7+, 8/24 Basketball; 8/31 Badminton; 9/7 Kickball, 5/3 TBD, 5/10 TBD, 5/17 TBD $5 supply fee + $5/session, session fee waived if parent stays & plays)

Forest School Instructor: Kara Kisby (Thursdays, 10 am-11:30 am, ages 8+, 9/14 Games & Building; 9/21 Games & Ecology; 9/28 Games & Arts & Crafts, $30 for 3 weeks)

Art Adventures Instructor: Skye Rosdahl (Thursdays, 10 am-12 pm, ages 8+, 10/5, 10/12, 10/26, 11/2, 11/9, 11/16, cost $84)

Drawing Instructor: Skye Rosdahl (Thursdays, 2:45-4:00 pm, ages 10+, 9/21, 10/5, 10/12, 10/26; cost $35)

Service Days (Thursdays, 10 am-11:30 am, ages 8+, 11/30 Manna Bags; 12/7 Elderly Visits, contributions of time and supplies welcome)

Music, Movement, & Memorization Instructor: Julia Jennings (Thursdays, 10 am-11:30 am, ages 7+, 3/8, 3/15, 3/22, 3/29, 4/12, 4/19: cost $65)

Contact: Kara Kisby, bountifulcreeksidelearning@gmail.com


sign-up-button-mdAll classes take place in the downtown Bountiful area. Contact specific class instructor for more details. Fill out this form to reserve a spot. A $10 non-refundable deposit for each class is due by August 1, 2017 to secure your spot. PayPal to bountifulcreeksidelearning@gmail.com or e-mail for details on mailing a check.

A stick is a whole toolbox…

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These musings by G.K. Chesterton reminded me of boys and springtime, and the wonderful thing that is imagination.

“All little boys, it may be noticed, like to possess a stick more almost than any other object, and in this, as in most things, little boys are very subtle sages. The stick is an abstraction; it is the straight line of Euclid; it is the primary principle of rigidity and direction. The stick is the backbone of the other structures; of the gun, the umbrella, the telescope, the spade, and the spear. Now the child, wishing for liberty and variety, wisely avoids realism, and clings to abstraction. If you have a telescope you cannot (without a violent effort) think it an umbrella. It were idle to look through a spade to find any of the emotions of a telescope. But if you have the plain bar or rod that is the rudimentary shape of all of them you can (if you are young enough) feel as if you possessed them all, and could take each of them in turn off its hook. A stick is a whole tool-box and a whole armoury. Nay, a stick is sometimes a stable. You can call it a horse and bestride it, and ride along country roads with the most mettlesome leaps and caracoles. I propose to do so in a few minutes.”

~G.K. Chesterton: Daily News, Oct. 23, 1909.

Ancient Egypt

62512227122004_mummy2Time Traveler here, I’m about to go back to 7500 BC to ancient Egypt. Egyptians were really hard to understand before we got the Rosetta Stone. Back in time where I am, I can see how they lived. The pyramids of Giza weren’t built because they hadn’t thought of building pyramids yet. Mummies were ancestors who passed away. They buried mummies using these steps.

  1. Take all the organs out except the heart and put them in jars.
  2. Fill the body with sawdust.
  3. Cover it with salt for 40 days.
  4. Wrap it.
  5. Cover the cloth with glue.

Egyptians thought that if you mummified your ancestors, their souls would go to the underworld. Egyptians are a very interesting people.

Posted by: TIME TRAVELER

The First Car

SteamMachineOfVerbiestIn1678Machine Maestro here with the first car dating back to 1670s. The man who invented the car was named Ferdinand Verbiest. He was born in Belgium on October 9, 1623! He was a mathematician and astronomer. I thought this would be a good subject to talk about because most people think that Henry Ford built the first car. Verbiest designed the so-called car. It was actually a trolley that was steam powered, made for the Chinese emperor. The big metal ball had the steam in it, which then traveled through a tube to the axle, which then turned the wheel. I hope this was a helpful post.

Stay tuned for my next post about the first American muscle cars. I hope you will enjoy.

 

Posted by: MACHINE MAESTRO

A Lesson to Remember

1600-1605“Genghis Khan and His Hawk” is a moral story retold by Lori Verstegen about Genghis Khan, the foremost ruler of his time, who learns to not act hastily. The story is set in Mongolia in the 1200s and tells about Genghis Khan and his Hawk. They are hunting game. In the story, the reader is launched on a roller coaster of curiosity that lands with a forceful lesson.

For this story, Genghis Khan and his hawk are the dominant characters. Khan almost never looks before leaping, and his hawk always keeps an eye out for his master. Conflict arises when Khan starts to feel fatigued and parched but is stymied by his hawk, who refuses to let him take a drink. Stunned and bewildered, he indignantly kills his hawk. But not before his cup flies out of reach. Unexpectedly, the crisis materializes when he climbs up to his cup and discovers a dead viper oozing venom into the water his hawk kept him from drinking. Contrite, Khan becomes melancholy. The theme for this story is disclosed by Khan, who says “I have killed my best friend. What a rash fool I was not to have trusted him…”

“Genghis Khan and his Hawk” is a story that certainly makes a reader think. At first it seems like it’s going to be a boring every day story about two friends. But fate has other plans. The story throws the reader for a loop when Khan’s tenacious hawk dives at him over and over to keep him from the water he needs. Then the story comes to an abrupt halt when Khan kills his friend, who is only trying to save his life. Clearly, this memorable story is the opposite of boring. Readers are taught how important it is to not be smug, but trust their friends, because their friends could be right. This is a lesson to remember.

Posted by : ADAM JONES

Emperor Penguins

Emperor PenguinsReporting from Antarctica. The temperatures are hovering around 0 degrees Fahrenheit. I was just on our research boat when I saw a large rookery of penguins. Knowing that penguins can range from one to five feet, and that Emperor penguins are the largest, I guessed that these were Emperor penguins. As I was getting off the boat, I saw some penguins hunting in the water for crustaceans, fish, and squid. They used their wings to propel themselves towards their food. I carefully stepped over rocks and snow to get a closer look at the penguins. As I got closer, I noticed steam rising from the center of the group. I had read that huddling penguins can create enough heat to produce steam. A few yards away, a bunch of other penguins were laying eggs or taking care of babies. The nests were made out of rocks, grass, and mud. When I approached the moms, a penguin squawked at me. I reassured her in my best penguin voice that I wasn’t there to take or scramble her eggs. The cold made me want to go back to the lab and continue my research about the warm and sunny great plains of Africa.

Posted by: OFFICER FAUNA

Imaginary Football: A Coral Reef Game

p013kyy0Welcome to todays imaginary football game! Today’s teams are the Sea Patriots and the Hula Turtles. The coaches are Mr. Biffle for the Sea Patriots and Sir Turtle for the Hula Turtles. Well, here come the fish (the fish are the audience). The football is made out of coral.  Today’s special stadium will be the coral reef.  Remember, don’t let the football touch the reef because you’ll lose it!  The seahorses (referees) are ready. The Sea Patriots are Mermen and the Hula Turtles are turtles, of course. Oh no! A shark swallowed the referee that was holding the football and the football is gone. We’ll have to make a new one. [Right after halftime…] It looks like the clams have opened up, letting out bubbles and it’s going to make it hard for the players to see. [After the bubbles have cleared…]  Well, it looks like that was a half an hour delay.  Let’s get the game going again! The Patriots will do a punt. [Half an hour later…] Well, it looks like that’s it folks.  The winners are the Hula Turtles! See you next time on imaginary football.

Posted by: THE DRAGON KEEPER